a simple pasta with broccoli, anchovies & garlic and a little why i love twitter

by Sam on July 19, 2012

broccoli pasta with anchovies, garlic & chilli

Lets talk a little about Twitter. If you know me you will know that I am ever so slightly addicted to it. It adds such an immense amount to my life, that I refuse to see this as a problem.

It took me a while to get into it, but now two and a half years on and around 14ooo tweets later, I feel like somewhat of a veteran.

I’ve observed how people behave here and seen a few ‘Twits’ come and go. As with ‘real’ life you don’t always get along with everyone all the time, and some people turn into really good friends.

I occasionally look at my Twitter stats to see how I interact and I am pleased that 70% of my total interactions are replies to people. Its a community of sharing and I don’t want to be a person that just spews out my own stuff without ‘chatting’ or responding to others. You can quickly pick up those that use this as a one way space.

I wish I had the time to get to know everyone who follows me, but I do read the tweets of everyone I follow so this would mean I would have less time in the kitchen.

One of the highlights of this strange and wonderful virtual place are the interesting and inspirational people I have met. Some of these people I have not yet met in the physical sense, and many I cant wait to.

There are a lot of foodies on my list and one of them that I have enjoyed over the years, been lucky enough to sit at a dinner table with, and someone who is very open to share  is @bigbigjoe1.

He comes from a family of passionate food journalists, is a self taught home-cook with a massive cookbook collection, and is not only well read, but used to write a monthly column for the Rapport. This was a part time thing for him because he has another full and all encompassing professional career.

He talks a bit about his earlier food inspiration:

My grandfather was the first man I ever saw being active in the kitchen with a passionate gleam in his eye; this was partly due to the fact that he outlived my grandma by many years. When she died he could hardly boil a kettle without burning the water; yet within a year his adventures in the kitchen became legendary: tomato bredie, smoorsnoek, a roast leg of pork with all the trimmings for Sunday lunch… He had a vegetable garden at the back of his house that kept the whole family in supply of whatever was seasonal, and fresh. In summer we’d stroll through- he carrying a small pot of salt in his pocket with a Joseph Rogers pocketknife, and we’d stop to pick the ripest of ripe tomatoes and eat them on the spot. From him I learnt to eat seasonally, and that a man’s place is as much inside the kitchen as outside of it. I learnt that happiness with one’s life partner can be infinitely shorter than what you’d wish it to be, and that the joys of family is most intense when shared around the kitchen table.  Even today, I long for the taste of those perfect tomatoes.

So there I was merrily tweeting about my beautiful broccoli (as you do) and looking for a inspiration to make something fabulous with it and @bigbigjoe1 suggested I make this pasta dish.

Hitting some of my favourite-flavour nerves head on, it is ridiculously easy and delicious.

This is what he says about the dish:

As for the pasta recipe with the broccoli, anchovies, garlic and chillies I sent you: it was hastily scribbled down from a television show some years ago; I think it was Gennaro Contaldo (Jamie Oliver’s mentor) who cooked it- it may even be based on one of his recipes. I fiddle with it according to taste: using more oil or less, sometimes a bit of butter as well (though never when I’m using the seasons first turbid-green pressing!) The trick is to barely melt the anchovies in the oil, then carefully add the chopped garlic and the chillies for flavour. Your smoked chillies add a much improved dimension to the dish, I must say. And pasta: always the best dried pasta available- De Cecco fusilli is my first choice. If using sprouting broccoli I cut the stalks off and add them to the boiling water when adding the pasta so that they are nice & soft;  I keep the florets back a little longer. A sprinkling of grated parmesan is a must right at the end; although many traditional Italians do not mix parmesan with an anchovy-based sauce. Locally I’ve found some ricotta salata from Puglia cheeses; an aged, pressed and heavily-salted cheese which also makes for an interesting twist.’

You see what I mean about how he writes?

Recipe (which you can adapt as per @bigbigjoe1′s advice above)

  • 1 small head of broccoli – florets cut off and stems sliced if young and tender
  • 6 – 8 anchovies
  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 1 – 2 garlic cloves crushed
  • pinch of dried chilli flakes (I used my oak smoked chilli flakes) – or a bit more if you like a kick
  • pasta for 2 people – about 150 – 200 grams (I used De Cecco Mafaldine no2 because I just loved the look of these wavy-edged ribbons)
  • Grated Parmesan cheese to server

Read the little story above on how to make it and how to use the stems if they are young enough, but to be a bit more precise:

Cook the pasta the usual way and while this is all going on, blanch the broccoli florets for about 5 minutes until they are just cooked but still firm. Heat the olive oil in the pan, add the anchovies and allow them to partially dissolve and soften in the oil. The oil is now quite warm. Then add the crushed garlic and chilli and toss it around for a few seconds taking it off the heat while you do this. You don’t want this to brown because it will go bitter. Add the steamed broccoli and toss this in the flavoured oil until it is well coated. The florets sort of suck up all  the liquid.

Stir this through your pasta and grate over generous amounts of Parmesan cheese.

These images don’t quite show how succulent and tasty this meal was, I literally had the aromatic sauce dripping down my chin.

Oh and one more thing, and this is important:

Wine. The dish needs a stiff glass of good sauvignon blanc, my preferred tipple is Hermit on the Hill’s sauvignon from Wine at the Mill, Nigel Cattermole’s shop at the Biscuit Mill. If it’s payday, a good Italina white suits better- classic Orvieto if you can lay your hands on it!’

Thanks for sharing @bigbigjoe1. You write so beautifully and descriptively, I find it utterly inspiring. I hope that one day you will consider putting these recipes and stories in a book. I know it is one that I would very much like to read.

PS: I was playing around with the styling of this shot and presented it in 2 ways. I prefer the version at the top.

PPS: I came across ‘the 10 things you need to stop tweeting about’ on the Oatmeal. Hilarious!

broccoli pasta with anchovies, garlic & chilli

I look forward to connecting with you again in the future.

Visit my Drizzle and Dip Facebook page to get updates of all my posts.

I can also be found enthusiastically pinning beautiful food images on Pinterest. 

 

 

{ 10 comments… read them below or add one }

Tandy July 19, 2012 at 4:34 pm

This is one of my favourites! And BBJ is an amazing person :)

nina July 19, 2012 at 5:27 pm

Which I was more Twitterable…….. You do have a positive vibe around you on Twitter and I love that. Great photo as always Sam!

Sam July 19, 2012 at 9:16 pm

Tandy, isn’t he just the best!

Sam July 19, 2012 at 9:17 pm

Thanks Nina, I have certainly spent a great deal of time there. x

Aninas Recipes July 20, 2012 at 10:40 am

Hey Sam, as for me, I am only entering the world of social media, although my hubby is an expert of trade. I am sure I will get into the groove and hopefully end up with thousands of tweets and followers!! I so enjoy to do what I do. I have found a little piece of my heart grow fonder and fonder of you and drizzle and dip. I love your photographs and easy simple recipes. Thank you for being a great inspiration to me, hopefully someday, I would get to sit around a dinner table with you too, eating until our tummies want to explode and having lots and lots of wine…

Sam July 22, 2012 at 4:39 pm

Hi Anina, thank you for the very kind words and its lovely to connect with you over the interwebz. I look forward to meeting you in Joburg.
S x

Zirkie July 22, 2012 at 5:19 pm

Delicious recipe, Sam! Where did you find the cute-looking pasta?

Sam July 23, 2012 at 9:48 am

Thanks Zirkie, it really is so much more delicious than it looks. I love that the garlic is hardly cooked and is very pungent, the anchovies give it huge flavour and the chilli some heat. x

Karen August 27, 2012 at 8:13 pm

Sam, just have to tell you that Rowan and I are completely addicted to this pasta. Have made it like four times in the last 2 weeks.

K

Sam August 28, 2012 at 9:29 am

Hi Karen, Ja it is a total winner. Hits all the spots. Lots of health and then packed with flavour.

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